Holidays

Autumn already?

Happy Autumn Equinox, everyone! Today marks the “official” start of fall in the Northern hemisphere, with exactly 12 hours of sunlight and 12 hours of darkness, and it’s all downhill from there as far as daylight goes, LOL, until December 21st. I hear it’s the only day where you can balance a pumpkin on its stem. Oh wait, that’s an egg…no, that’s a myth, right?

It doesn’t feel like fall in Virginia yet, and it probably won’t in places like Texas until the winter solstice.

Moving on….

Of course, there are plenty of “unofficial” occasions that mark the start of fall for some folks. The end of Labor Day weekend. The first day back to school for the kiddos. The very tops of the sugar maples starting to turn red and gold. Ah, bliss. I love fall.

But I’m not here to talk about those particular signs. I’m here to talk about September 1st, aka the start of Pumpkin Spice Latte season in the Starbucks world. That’s what fall is really all about, Charlie Brown. *wink*

Pumpkin Spice…the source of delight and mockery. 

 

It’s all a matter of perspective.

You may have seen “a few” things on the internet about the pumpkin spice phenomenon. Seems like there’s a pumpkin spice for every occasion (at least hypothetically, haha).

For the horror movie fans:

For the second amendment folks:

 

Even the automotive DIYers can get in on the pumpkin spice craze, LOL:

As for me, I used to be a PSL fan, but I switched to mochas – a year-round, good-ol’ reliable flavor. But hey, you PSL enthusiasts out there, rock on. The world can use all the comfort it can get right now. Wave your flag proudly.

While I don’t drink PSLs anymore, I’m still a fan of pumpkin flavored desserts and treats. In fact, after checking my list of recipes on my iPad (I love the Recipe Tin app!), I was a bit startled to discover that I have 21 pumpkin recipes. Only one ingredient category has a larger number: chicken, at 24. Beef trailed in at third, tied with chocolate, at 20 each.

(Chocolate is tied for third? It’s a world gone mad. *sob*).

I’ve already shared my pumpkin fudge and pumpkin tiramisu recipes in earlier posts (listed below), but I figured ’tis the season for pumpkin, so why not another? So here’s my recipe for pumpkin creme brulee, a dessert featured in at least one of my Concordia books. Enjoy!

Pumpkin Crème Brulee (4 servings)

Ingredients:
1 1/2 cups heavy cream
1 tsp cinnamon
¼ tsp ground cloves
½ tsp ginger
½ tsp freshly grated nutmeg
5 egg yolks
½ tsp vanilla extract
¼ cup pumpkin puree, fresh or canned
1/3 cup granulated white sugar
1 tablespoon light brown sugar, firmly packed
For sugar shell top: 4 tsp granulated white sugar.

Directions:
Preheat oven to 325 degrees (Fahrenheit). In a saucepan, whisk cream, cinnamon, cloves, ginger, and nutmeg over medium-low heat for 3-5 minutes, until bubbles form around edges of saucepan and steam rises from the surface. DO NOT BOIL. Take pan off the heat and set aside for 15 minutes.

Meanwhile, whisk together egg yolks, vanilla, pumpkin puree, and sugars (except that reserved for sugar top) in a large bowl until ingredients are fully incorporated. Strain through a fine mesh sieve, and whisk the somewhat-cooled cream mixture into the strained mixture. Divide into four ramekins (8oz size).

What the bath looks like. Be sure to cover w/foil before putting in the oven.

Hot water bath: place ramekins in a large baking pan, and pour boiling water into the pan (around the ramekins) until water is halfway up the sides of the ramekins. Cover with aluminum foil and bake in the oven for 30-40 minutes, or until set. It may still be a little jiggly in the middle, but that should set as it cools.

Once they have cooled to room temperature, cover with plastic wrap (don’t touch the wrap to the surface of the custard) and chill in the fridge.

Just before serving, sprinkle 1 tsp of white sugar over top of each custard and either use a small kitchen torch to carmelize the surface, or put ramekins on a baking sheet and set it under the boiler for a minute or two, until the sugar is melted and the top is browned. Let cool briefly, and serve.

What do you enjoy about the fall? Do you have a favorite food this time of year? I’d love to hear from you.

Until next time,

Kathy

Want more pumpkin recipes? Check out these posts:

for pumpkin fudge:

Start your Halloween with a Pumpkin Mashup!

Taste of Fall: Pumpkin Tiramisu

 

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My funny Valentine

Hubby and I have been married a while now (27 years and counting), so we’ve seen a lot of Valentine’s Days come and go. For us, the occasion is usually marked by wine, chocolate, and me not cooking. Winning!

It’s also a great occasion to reflect on relationships. With that in mind, I’m re-posting a piece that Paul and I co-wrote 5 years ago when, in honor of Valentine’s Day, we commented upon one another’s “eccentricities.” (My updates/new commentary in RED).  Enjoy!

Foibles

“Foible” is defined as “a minor weakness or eccentricity in one’s character.”  Sometimes foibles can be the death of relationships; however, in other instances, they are what lend interest and individuality.

To celebrate foibles “up close” in all their quirky glory, we’re approaching today’s blog post a little differently:  hubby and I are going to discuss each other’s foibles.  Yep, I’m going to point out his “eccentricities” and he’s going to point out mine!  Let’s hope we make it to Valentine’s Day next year, LOL.

But I get to go first (hey, it’s my blog).

My description of Paul:

My hubby. He’s smiling now; just wait until he reads this…

Paul enjoys what he himself terms “geeky” pursuits.  He loves boardgaming and math – whether it’s Age of Renaissance or Fractals, he shows equal enthusiasm.  He has me playing a lot of these boardgames now, too, and he designed one of his own that was published last year by BlueSquare Games – squee! – called Trains, Planes, and Automobiles. It’s a cool game, although I know I’m biased.  By the way, fractals look nice, but I’ll never get it.

He’s a former Naval Academy grad and submariner who now works in the computer software/project management field (and that’s all I can tell you without having the free world fall to pieces and being required to shoot myself or something), has played classical piano since elementary school (never mind how long ago that was), and is a fab father to our three boys, who also like to tease dad about his little eccentricities.

 

On to…Paul’s foibles:

Here are a few that stem from his Yankee frugality:

  • He saves everything, especially boxes.  We have a gazillion cardboard shipping boxes, of all different shapes and sizes.  It’s sort of an archaeological dig of nearly everything we’ve ever ordered or been gifted with in the past decade.  Amazon seems to be our biggest supplier. I’ve nested them as best I can so they don’t take up too much space.  Now it’s a long row of big boxes at the top of the laundry room rafters, with “MORE BOXES INSIDE” scrawled across the fronts in sharpie.
  • He puts scrap paper back in the printer tray.  The rest of us keep forgetting he does this, and when we click “print”  and pull out the sheet – arghh!!  Dad put scrap paper in the printer again! It’s like a little ambush, every time.  Bwahaha. One of these days, I’m going to remember to swap out the paper.
  • He disassembles and saves wooden planks/parts from broken Ikea furniture.  It starts to build up after a while (although I’ll admit, it came in handy a couple of times).  Spiders and stinkbugs seem to like hanging out there, so whenever we need wood for a project, he has to go get it.

And then there are the times when we’re in the car, and he’s the one driving:  he waits until what feels like the last blessed moment to get into the turn lane. Meanwhile, I’m dying to say something, like “Um, the turn’s coming up, honey, are you going to change lanes now?”  My knuckles turn white, clenching the arm rest, willing myself to stay quiet, but all the while, thinking:  “we’re going to miss the turn, we’re not going to make it, no one will let us in the lane….”  I have to admit, it gives each trip a little zing! of uncertainty.

If he’s feeling particularly generous that day, he’ll give me a little look, and change lanes early.  Happy Birthday, dear. (Maybe he’ll take pity on me this Valentine’s Day).

Speaking of driving, the kids crack up when Paul is backing up the car; he turns his head toward the rear window (where they can see him at ground zero), and makes his “pirate back-up face.”   It’s totally unconscious, but he bares his teeth and scrunches his cheeks in a sort of “Arrr” pirate grimace. (He got new glasses since then, and doesn’t need to scrunch his face anymore. I miss pirate back-up face….)

The boys also like to tease dad about the following:

  • the way he eats corn on the cob (indescribable)
  • laughing (big, belly-laughing guffaws.  No one hearing him can keep from laughing, too)
  • His pet phrase of exasperation: “Oh, for crying out loud.”  I seem to be picking up that one nowadays, LOL. (Yes, it is definitely now part of my vocabulary. You can’t swing a cat without hitting a “for crying out loud.”)

So that is my dear-heart, frugal, laugh-out-loud man, whom I love with all my being.  I wouldn’t trade a single foible.  And it would be really easy to tell if aliens ever kidnap him and switch him out for a pod growing in the basement.

…Your turn, honey!

Hello, this is Paul, husband of K.B. Owen. I should start by making absolutely clear that I love my wife with all my heart, and nothing she can do will sway me from my eternal devotion to her, heart and soul. (K: Isn’t he just the cutest thing?) 

That said, I understand that I am free to share with the Internet World a few observations that I have made regarding the customary behavior of my Beloved that some might consider … idiosyncratic.  Only a few things come to mind.

image via clker.com

First, my darling Sweetheart has a propensity for always finding a better way to arrange and store things that we as a family all need to be able to find every day.  The best example is the kitchen.  Whenever I go to look for, say, a coffee cup, I go to the cupboard where I remember that we said we would put them … “oh, wait, that was where they were last fall.  I remember now, she moved them over here by the refrigerator. … No, wait, that was around Christmas time.  I think they’re … Kathy, where are the coffee cups now?”  I kid you not, this happens several times a week.  “Don’t you remember, Paul?  I told you two weeks ago that I moved the coffee cups over by the microwave.”  “Oh, yes, you moved them [with a certain pained emphasis to imply, ‘for no earthly reason that I can imagine’].  Of course you told me.  Of course I remember.”  The problem is that’s not the first thing I remember when I think of where to look for a coffee cup.  Truth is, it’s about the eighth candidate on the list of possible places the coffee cups could be today. (K: Hmm…I haven’t rearranged anything in a while. That gives me an idea….)

Second, the delight of my heart bakes Christmas cookies, dozens upon dozens, in a major evolution that spans weeks and dominates the kitchen and dining room and fills the house with the irresistable aroma of baking, only to forbid upon penalty of death and severed fingers that anybody should so much as touch one of them.  “They’re for the neighbors/friends / homeless people / strangers in the bayou.  You can’t touch them.  Here, have this one; it’s burnt/broken/ otherwise defective and therefore unpresentable outside the family whom I don’t have to impress.”  So we all, our three sons and myself, swoon over the odors of Christmas cookies, drool over the sight of them on their cooling racks, and console ourselves with the notion that at some point on Christmas day, after all the neighbors, friends, and vagrants have been satisfied, we’ll have our crack at whatever small fraction of the baked manifestation of our wife and mother’s love remains in the house in the form of leftover Christmas cookies.

(K: I now bake “decoy” cookies to keep the hungry horde away from the more time-intensive Christmas cookies…hey, I’m not without a heart….)

Sanders and Snowball. RIP.

Third, I have learned never to maintain hope that our home will be rodent-free.  For as long as I can remember, our house has had some kind of terrarium or cage (or two or three), and within them some form of cute, fuzzy hamster, gerbil, Guinea pig, or even rabbit running on its wheel or in its ball or around its cage.  Over the years, I found that no sooner would I have buried some poor beastie (K: after it has languished in a paper bag in the freezer for a few months) in the woods behind our house than the next day I would come home from work greeted by my darling wife’s latest find at the pet store, some new little creature twitching its whiskers at me as if to say, “Aren’t I cute?  Don’t you just love me?  Won’t you feed me for the rest of my fuzzy little captive life?” Oh, for crying out loud. (No more rodents…we now have a cat. Hubby pretends he grudgingly accepts her. Yeah, right–he’s not fooling anyone. *wink*)

 

So, there you have it – wife and hubby, dishing on each other’s “foibles.”

What foibles do you live with on behalf of your beloved?  We’d love to hear from you!  Come on, give us the good stuff!

 

Happy Valentine’s Day!

Kathy and Paul

Paul tweets at @paulowengames

Blog: paulowengames.blogspot.com

(Here’s a pic of us celebrating our 26th anniversary in Bermuda!)

 

 

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Happy Thanksgiving! What’s on the Menu?

Puck Thanksgiving cover, 1896.

Puck Thanksgiving cover, 1896.

Happy Tuesday before Thanksgiving! We’re all pressed for time right now, so I’ll just share a brief montage of interesting historical menus as you plan yours…who knows? It may give you ideas.

Another cool thing about the following menus is who is hosting it. We have a hotel, a college, and…a hospital. I guess everyone wants turkey on Thanksgiving, although some of these menus make it seem like turkey is an afterthought. *wink*

 

 

Hotel Vendome Thanksgiving Menu, 1895. Image via wikimedia commons.

Hotel Vendome Thanksgiving Menu, 1895.

The one below is tough to read, my apologies. I can make out Mock Turtle Soup, and Salmon, but I have trouble after that. I’m sure turkey is in there somewhere.

1874 Vassar College Thanksgiving Menu. Image via wikimedia commons.

1874 Vassar College Thanksgiving Menu.

 

Thanksgiving menu, 1864. Jarvis U.S.A. General Hospital, Baltimore.

Thanksgiving menu, 1864. Jarvis U.S.A. General Hospital, Baltimore.

Hmm, looks yummy. And what variety! Who knew hospital food was holiday-worthy? But someone needed spell-check on “turkies.”

Most of us won’t be eating at a fancy hotel or at a college, and I sure hope we won’t be eating at a hospital! So, if you’re cooking at home, be safe. Firefighters see house fires triple on Thanksgiving Day, with some states in the Union more prone than others. For more info on that, check out my 2014 post:

When Turkeys Strike Back

However you spend your holiday, or even if it isn’t a holiday in your part of the world, I wish you much to be grateful for. I know that I’m grateful for all of you!

Until next time,

Kathy

P.S. – If you’re in the vicinity of Manassas, Virginia on Shop Small Saturday (Nov 26th), I’ll be doing a book signing and would love to see you!

booksigningflyer

 

 

 

 

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After the good-bye

After the good-bye

 

Hi everyone,

I have missed you! If I had known my cicada post was going to stay up as my most recent offering for the past six weeks, I might have picked something else….

dad29The reason for my silence is a sad one. My dad passed away three weeks ago. The deterioration of his condition over these last few months tugged at our hearts and our conflicting responsibilities, with road trips, time away from work, and the long-distance parenting of teens on the one hand, and hospital visits, medical decisions, and assuming our best game face for my dad (and my mom) on the other. And then there came the time when there were no more options, no more decisions to be made…and we had to face the reality of saying goodbye to this wonderful man. Many of you have lived this, and I have a renewed appreciation for what you’ve undergone.

I had considered just quietly resuming my blog without mentioning it. After all, I prefer to keep the tone of my posts light-hearted, especially in a world that can sometimes be rather grim. I also didn’t want to make anyone feel uncomfortable. Death and grieving are difficult social topics, to say the least. We all want to console, to offer sympathy, but we worry that what we say will seem like empty platitudes. We feel helpless, not quite knowing what to say or do.

Rest assured, sympathy in any form is never meaningless. It is a kindness that can soothe. I have been very grateful for it.

I finally opted for saying something because I also value authenticity. I could not imagine resuming my writing and blogging without a public acknowledgment of my loss. My dad was my first crush. He loved me unconditionally. He made me feel I could accomplish anything. Missing him is as natural as breathing.

Dad Pat Corey summer

Steve Belin was a wonderful Pop, too! Pictured here with his oldest and youngest grandsons.

I know I will continue to grieve – some days will be more difficult than others – but I feel ready to get back to my routine. Focusing on the positive helps. I am blessed to have terrific memories to look back upon.

Here’s a special memory I want to share with you! It includes a recipe, just in time for Father’s Day and the backyard grilling season. It was originally written three years ago as a Father’s Day column for SocialIn Arlington. Enjoy!

Dad’s Secret to Great BBQ Chicken

We all know that Father’s Day gives us a chance to recognize the special dads in our lives.  Perhaps, when we think of our fathers, we recall the games of catch, or the family road trips, or our favorite televised sporting events, or maybe those long workdays that dad had to put in – a sacrifice that, as adults, we now truly recognize.

While I have a lot of those kinds of memories, I always think of my dad as…the Griller.  The man could make anything edible taste amazing when cooked over open flame.  During the summer months, I thrived on steak, chicken, kabobs, pasta salad, and burnt marshmallows.  As his only child, I learned all his tips and tricks – whether charcoal or gas, lighter fluid or a flick of the switch, it didn’t matter.  He was the Grill Master, and I was his young Padawan.  I learned The Way of the Tongs.

So in honor of Father’s Day, I’d like to share a family favorite that I turn to again and again: my dad’s trick for cooking juicy, skinless, fall-from-the-bone barbecue chicken.

Ingredients:

6 chicken leg quarters (thigh and drumstick still attached).  If you opt for chicken breasts, reduce cooking time by 10 minutes so they don’t dry out. But check for doneness. Always.

16 ounces of your favorite barbecue sauce (the thicker, the better)

Heavy duty aluminum foil

Directions:

Carefully strip the skin from the raw chicken , washing BOTH the skin and the chicken and blotting everything dry.  Do NOT discard the skin.

(NOTE: Since the original post, the USDA now recommends that raw chicken NOT be washed, because of risk of cross-contamination. Read more about it here: Washing Food: Does it promote food safety?)

Place the chicken quarters side-by-side on a generous square of heavy-duty foil, meaty sides up.  If you think all six legs would make the packet too cumbersome – you’ll be flipping it on the grill – you can divide the legs between two packets, rather than having them all in one.

Place the skins loosely BACK ON TOP of the chicken legs, covering the meaty parts in particular.  This will keep the chicken extra-moist, and will be ridiculously easy to take off before the sauce goes on.

Crimp the foil firmly around the edges to form a packet to seal in most of the juices. Some will escape during grilling, but don’t worry about that.  You want a little room inside there – don’t wrap them tightly in the foil, as you would a potato.

Grill the packet(s) over a hot fire. For charcoal briquettes, that means they are all gray, and you can barely tolerate holding a hand over the coals. For a gas grill, set it to medium-high heat. Grill for 40 minutes, flipping the packet once after the first 20 minutes.

Take the packet(s) off the grill and cut open the foil (use oven mitts when handling  – it’s going to be hot and rather messy).  The skin will slide right off. Discard skin and foil.

Pour barbecue sauce into a shallow pan.  Using tongs, DREDGE the chicken in the sauce, coating both sides.   (We don’t mess around with brushes at our house.  It’s all we can do not to lick our fingers).  It’s a little tricky, because the chicken will want to come off the bone at this point.  Show ‘em who’s boss.

Return the coated chicken to the grill, cooking for barely 2 minutes on each side, until the sauce is set.

Do you have a favorite recipe that reminds you of someone you care about? I’d love to hear from you.

Until next time,

Kathy

 

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Grandma under the mistletoe!

Grandma under the mistletoe!

…and you thought folks were prudish in the 19th century. Ah, the magic of mistletoe. For the young, and the young at heart. Go, Grandma!

The Corvallis Gazette (Corvallis, OR), Dec 24, 1897. Chronicling America, Library of Congress.

The Corvallis Gazette (Corvallis, OR), Dec 24, 1897. Chronicling America, Library of Congress.

 

Careful who you kiss under the mistletoe, however:

Anaconda Standard (Montana), 24 Feb 1895. Image via Chronicling America, Library of Congress.

Anaconda Standard (Montana), 24 Feb 1895. Image via Chronicling America, Library of Congress.

 

Was he letting people kiss his wife so he’d have an excuse to kiss the girl? Hmm.

Mistletoe was a sought-after item at Christmas-time in the 19th century, and holiday revelers placed “kissing boughs” in strategic places (though never in a church, as the custom originated among the ancient Druids, and sometimes involved human sacrifice). There is a difference between English and American mistletoe, and apparently back then clients in the northeastern U.S. were very picky, preferring the English variety. Perhaps some “explosive kissing” was anticipated? See below:

The Evening Star (Wash, DC), 24 Dec 1889. Image via Chronicling America, Library of Congress (highlighting mine).

The Evening Star (Wash, DC), 24 Dec 1889. Image via Chronicling America, Library of Congress (highlighting mine).

Those folks really knew how to revel, didn’t they? How does one “use up” mistletoe? …never mind.

Do you decorate with real mistletoe? (We have an artificial mistletoe ball in our house – the berries are poisonous. A sick cat is hardly romantic). For that matter, has anyone even seen real mistletoe recently, or has it gone the way of the Druids?

I won’t ask y’all about any plans for “explosive kissing” (*wink*), but I’d love to hear what else you’re up to! And I’m still giving away ebooks to commenters (up to ten copies in total, and good until Christmas), so if you want a free copy of any book in my series, let me know which book and whether you prefer epub (Nook, iPad) or mobi (Kindle), and I’ll send it off to you.

Concordia series 1to4

No matter what you are celebrating this season, I wish you the brightest of holidays!

Until next time,

Kathy

 

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Gifts for the avid reader, 19th century style

Gifts for the avid reader, 19th century style

‘Tis the season for buying gifts, and books are among the best gifts out there! (So sayeth the book lover). If you go on Amazon (which got its start as an online bookseller back in 1994) and look for best-selling book suggestions, you’ll see something like this:

21st century books

 

But what did readers – and those who loved them – choose from in the 1890s? How did they decide? Obviously, there were no internet recommendations to consult. They relied upon ads in magazines and newspapers, recommendations from friends, or their corner bookshop proprietor. Not so different from today, if you think about it. The ad below gives us an idea of some of the hot books of the time:

1895 chromolithograph, Armstrong & Co, Boston. Image via wikimedia commons.

You’d better know your Latin numerals! 1895 chromolithograph, Armstrong & Co, Boston. Image via wikimedia commons.

 

Famous authors often put out new pieces around the holidays, too. These days, we have Grisham and Patterson. In the late-19th century, readers had Mark Twain:

Cover of the New York World, Christmas 1899. Image via wikimedia commons.

Cover of the New York World, Christmas 1899. Image via wikimedia commons.

Nothing says “Christmas” like “My First Lie and How I Got Out of It.”

 

Perhaps a magazine subscription for the avid reader in your life? But the December 1893 issue of The Strand Magazine is when Doyle kills off the Great Detective, Sherlock Holmes.

Sorry folks, Holmes is dead. Oh well…Merry Christmas!

 

The Strand, December 1893. Image via wikimedia commons.

The Strand, December 1893. Image via wikimedia commons.

Do you give books or magazines as gifts? I’d love to hear from you.

Until next time,

Kathy

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The Spirit of Christmas

The Spirit of Christmas

The more ad-weary among us have wondered if the spirit of Christmas is shopping, but after a few cleansing breaths we can see that it’s really about stepping outside ourselves to serve others in some way. Whether it’s a bottle of Aunt Gertie’s favorite perfume, donating a turkey dinner, volunteering at a soup kitchen, or shoveling snow for an elderly neighbor, we are making someone’s day a bit brighter.

We are inspired by stories of a person’s need being met by a generous heart. And our great-grandparents were, too. Here’s a December 24, 1899 article from The New York Times:

 

 

Now, with the power of social media, we can make our charitable giving less haphazard and even more effective. Today is #GivingTuesday, a designated day of charitable giving. It was first created three years ago, in response to the uber-consumerist traditions of Black Friday and Cyber Monday.

givingTues2 Check out their website (or Facebook or Twitter) for more info on how you can get involved today. You can even share your story on their Facebook page and on Twitter. They are going for the Guinness World Record for most online charitable donations in a single day! Wouldn’t that be awesome? Many local television and radio stations are also participating, offering apps for your smartphone that make it easy to check out the needs of local schools and charities in your neighborhood. Amazon has also set up Amazon Smile, where you select your charity, make purchases through that site instead of the regular Amazon site, and Amazon donates 0.5% of certain purchased items (indicated on the screen whether the item qualifies). There are a lot of charities participating, so if you don’t immediately see your favorite (our fave is S.O.M.E. – So Others Might Eat – and it’s on there!), there’s a search bar you can use.

In the spirit of giving, I want to offer the first twenty commenters of this post a gift. No strings, no random drawing later. If you’ve already read all of my books, feel free to gift it to someone else. Just let me know which one of the following you would prefer:

Your choice of ebook (please indicate your preferred file format – epub or mobi):

…or my new release, Unseemly Haste!

UnseemlyHasteEbookCover

 

Or, you can choose an audiobook instead:

DangerousAndUnseemlyAudioNEW

 

UnseemlyPursuitsAudio

Not familiar with The Concordia Wells Mysteries? Read more about the books by clicking on the blue square below:

Concordia logo FINAL small

What’s your favorite charity? Have you heard of Giving Tuesday? I’d love to hear from you.

Until next time,

Kathy

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Thanksgivings past

Thanksgivings past

To all of my American friends, Happy Thanksgiving! Here’s a re-post from one I wrote a few years back, about the similar ways in which Thanksgiving was celebrated a hundred years ago. Food, football, helping those in need…notice that Black Friday is conspicuously missing.

Enjoy your holiday,

Kathy

————————————————-

Check out these snippets of late-19th/early-20th century Thanksgivings, through the eyes of reporters from The New York Times. Enjoy!

Even back then, it was all about the turkey:

…although Thanksgiving was about generosity, too:

Click here for the entire November 26, 1908 article.

 

College football was another Thanksgiving tradition:

 


 

Click here for the entire November 30, 1899 article.

Hope this helps get you in the mood for the upcoming holiday!  What do you consider absolutely essential for your Thanksgiving?  I’d love to hear from you.

Until next time,

Kathy

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